World Toilet Day November 19

Top facts

The global sanitation crisis is reflected in the following facts, according to reports from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):

  • Around 60% of the global population – 4.5 billion people – either have no toilet at home or one that doesn’t safely manage excreta.
  • 862 million people worldwide still practise open defecation – this means human faeces, on a massive scale, is not being captured or treated.
  • 1.8 billion people use an unimproved source of drinking water with no protection against contamination from faeces.
  • One third of schools worldwide do not provide any toilet facilities – a particular problem for girls during menstruation.
  • 900 million schoolchildren across the world have no handwashing facilities – a critical barrier in the spread of deadly diseases.
  • Globally, 80% of the wastewater generated by society flows back into the ecosystem without being treated or reused.

http://www.un.org/en/events/toiletday/

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Diseases and cures…

Write a blog post including the following:

  • After reading the two texts about Goal. 3 we read last week, you will find the links in the post “Good health and well-being”  – what do you think are the  biggest challenges yet to solve in order for this goal to be reached? Explain your answer.
  • Use WHO’s website or other relevant pages you find and look at emergencies. Choose either an area or a disease and do some research – what is going on here? What emergency is being caused by this disease, or what medical emergencies are going on in the area you chose? Read up, and then explain in your own words. Include what is being done, and look up other sources as well to see if you can find more supporting evidence.
  • Reflect: based on your new knowledge about a disease, or an area in medical emergency – what would you say is being done to reach goal 3? What would you say is NOT being done, but should be done? Can you think of any challenges that could hinder progress for this goal? Which and why? Can you think of any solutions for these challenges?

 

We will then watch “Ethical Riddles in HIV research” by Boghuma Kabisen Titanji, and read “MSF: Johnson&Johnson prices keep key TB medicines out of reach” from Doctors Without Borders.

 

Hanna

In the news: Hunger increasing due to climate change

 

Hunger increasing due to climate change, according to a UN report.

It found that 821 million people — one in every nine — were malnourished in 2017, up from 815 million in 2016, putting at risk the UN’s goal of eradicating hunger in the world by 2030.

In the news: Erna Solberg speaks to UN General Assembly

She mentioned the importance of girls’ education and spoke about other sustainable development goals, such as Life below Water and the huge amount of plastics found in our oceans. She also spoke about Norway’s candidacy for a seat in the UN Security Council.

H.E. Mrs.Erna Solberg

Listen to the whole speech/read the transcript here:

https://gadebate.un.org/en/73/norway

“The extremists have shown what frightens them the most – a girl with a book”

Yesterday, this article was posted in the New York Times. It relates directly to the topics we are working with, quality education and gender equality. It is about an incident in Pakistan where 14 schools, most of them for girls, where burned down during one night, in a district where only 11% of the girls know how to read and write.

Hanna

Freedom of speech for everyone?

The French philosopher Voltaire once said:

“I may not agree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

Watch Farred Zakaria on CNN talk about how conservative voices are being silenced, being concerned about how on both sides of the political spectre, people seem less interested to hear the arguments and opinions of the other side.

How far does freedom of speech go?

Can you lose your freedom of speech? How/why?

How should we react when someone uses their freedom of speech to offend us?

Visit this site from The Wall Street Journal and choose a topic.

See how conservative and liberal Facebook present the topic you have chosen.

Write a post where you discuss:

  • which topic did you choose to look at?
  • What is the conservative posts about, and what is the liberal posts about?
  • Are there any posts which you felt were offensive or promoting hate/negativity? Why?
  • Think about freedom of speech, should we be allowed to post whatever we want on social media, or are there limits?
  • Look at the side you disagree the most with, and try to find their best argument. Is there anything you can see having merit, making sense, something you can understand that people would think? What?

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(Picture from https://thequeerness.com/2016/03/07/freedom-of-speech-is-no-longer-about-rights-its-about-power/)

How different countries use newsproviding media

Wow, you gave me a challenge here – how do we approach this topic?

In groups, make a Prezi presentation of media usage in the country you have been given. Some things might be easy to find out, others a bit harder, and others yet again might be impossible… but let’s try! 🙂

Find out:

  • do they have a free press or any kind of censorship? Why/why not?
  • do they have state media or not? What could be the importance of this?
  • What are the biggest newsproviding media in this country?
  • Who owns these media?
  • How many use these?
  • Are they politically minded – liberal, conservative etc? If so, how is this seen?
  • Find the three biggest newsproviding media in this country and look at their frontpages: compare headlines, choice of causes, focus, read a story from each and comment on the journalism. Also, find them on social media; check out their Facebook page, Twitter and Instagram account. How are they on social media? Many followers? What kind of profile do they have here? What kind of cases are their fronting on their social media?

 

Answers:

Media in South Africa

Media in China

Media in Brazil

Media in India